5 Dec 2017

Early December in the Veg Patch

How many people are currently hunkering down inside, away from plummeting temperatures and relishing the warmth and cosiness of being tucked away from the cold?  I know the temptation to stay indoors on a dreary, possibly drizzly, day gets me every time. Grey skies do not motivate me. But I always surprise myself with how good it feels to get outside, wrapped up against the cold, for a walk or an hour's work in the garden.  There are always jobs to do, even (or especially?) at this time of year.  I still have leaves to rake and store, bulbs to plant and mulching to finish. Trees need pruning and a few perennials need to be relocated. I admit I enjoy the peace of working outside in winter, it clears my mind and gives me the headspace to think.

Last weekend Michelle at Vegplotting blog hosted another of her #mygardenrightnow challenges, inviting gardeners to get together on social media with a snap of themselves in their winter gardens.  We've had such a good warm autumn (and by that I mean temperatures still in the mid to high 50F range (10-15C) with occasional sun) that many of those gardeners were able to show plants in bloom.  Could I match that with anything in the veg patch? Let's have a look.












They say the camera never lies but I confess that these are pretty much solitary flowers - apart from the sage, nasturtiums and feverfew!  But, looking at these, if I didn't know better, I'd think it was still summer!

Here's the reality:


Okay, so that doesn't quite prove my point but my woolly hat is essential gardening kit at this time of year! Those raspberries are genuine but I only have a couple of stalks to make a very small pudding! Umm, that just made me think of raspberry ripple ice cream; I wonder if there's enough for a sauce :)  The garden usually does quite well for a bit of greenery at this time of year as the usual suspects - strawberries, kales and herbs - will carry on through the winter. The  nasturtiums and scented pelargonium (the mass of green at the far end of the plot) are much more delicate but might survive. You can see how the garden is surrounded by buildings (we're clad in scaffolding at present) plus there's a long brick wall on the west side - and the veg patch itself is bordered by a low brick wall. I think it all helps to maintain a warmer micro-climate which helps the plants combat any cold. One thing though, I wish I'd made time to sow some broccoli and sprouts earlier this year - this will be my first winter without PSB. Lesson learned, I've already scheduled those into my sowing calendar for next year.

I hope I'm right about the micro-climate as it looks like London will be getting much colder by next week - but that's how it should be.  After a good prolonged autumn, I'm ready to embrace a bit of hygge indoors over the christmas holidays.  It will be hot chocolate, survival cake, gardening books and bracing walks on Hampstead Heath for me - how about you?


Linking to Through the Garden Gate over at Down by the Sea, Sarah's blog.
Also pop over to Veg Plotting to catch a few more bloggers winter gardens!


14 comments:

  1. I agree about the temptation to stay in and hunker down with a book or in my case a Kindle is challenging to resist but after being out busily gardening the feeling is even better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree, Sue. And, bizarrely, I often find that it's warmer out than I was expecting!

      Delete
  2. Oh yes, that sounds like a lovely plan. I do like the idea of survival cake. You have reminded me that I found something that might or might not be raspberry sauce lurking in the freezer. I'm trying to have a bit of a clear out before the festive season. It will be borlotti beans with everything next week. I like a bit of winter gardening as well. I always stay out longer than I plan too; once I get going it's lovely out there. I even tackled the pond at the weekend, one of my least favourite things. Still lots to do to tidy up though. I shall definitely need cake at the end of it all. Gorgeous flower photos, and good to see you in the garden. The raspberries look amazing, so blemish free. I shall go and check mine tomorrow but I fear there is nothing left out there. CJ xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh gosh, yes, couldn't we all do with double the fridge and freezer space over christmas! I'm impressed that you tackled the pond, my fingers are cold just thinking about it - those unwanted tasks are usually the most satisfying to tick off the list though. I'll try and post about survival cake - less heavy than a fruit cake and with ALCOHOL! Haha! xx

      Delete
    2. Still need to sort out my allotment - this year has flown by. Will try and do some this Saturday. Christmas will be quiet - just chilling with family and friends.

      Delete
    3. Ah, anonymous, I wish I knew who you were so that I could pop over and say hello! I'm totally with you on the disappearing year, it feels as though the pace has certainly hotted up last year and, secretly, I'm hoping for something a bit calmer in 2018. Chilling with family and friends at christmas sounds absolutely perfect to me! It will be the same here.

      Delete
  3. Good post and pictures. I've spent three mornings plotting this week, and even cut the grass paths. I think that's about it for this year, and will now be spending plenty of time armchair gardening over the winter. xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Flighty, and well done for tackling the grass paths - that's another job still to do at the allotment. Enjoy your armchair gardening, I think mine is a little way off yet but certainly never far from my thoughts! xx

      Delete
  4. Your plants look great. I only wish mine looked this good with such a weather, lol!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Diana, thanks for visiting my blog and commenting, nice to meet you! It's a lovely surprise to still have flowers in winter but it's definitely nature rather than nurture in this case! I'm lucky to be growing in a microclimate which keeps temperatures a couple of degrees higher than less sheltered environments, also these plants are all self sown which means they've adapted better to the growing conditions, ie, they're tough little beasts!
      You don't say where you're located but remember that summer comes round for all of us!

      Delete
  5. How true, once we make the effort to get out it is enjoyable. They say there's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing. Good to see your remaining flowers and those yummy looking raspberries! Here's to your long walks and survival cake!!!xxx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah yes, I'd forgotten that saying, Dina! Being wrapped up against the cold makes all the difference, especially in cold winds. With flowers still blooming though, it makes my job of clearing the veg patch quite tricky - next year's broad beans have yet to go in!!
      PS the long walks are needed to exercise the cake off!! Lol! xxx

      Delete
  6. Oh apart from the recent hiccup in the weather I really like being outside at this time of year Caro although perhaps my periods of activity are shorter in length. I'm chuckling at Snowbird's comment about bad weather. Do you find that the autumn raspberries loose some of their flavour as the season gets later? Your planned post Christmas hygge activities sound just perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sorry I have only just found your comment about linking with me! I certainly can't do without my woolly hat in the garden at the moment! Amazing to see you still have some raspberries! Sarah x

    ReplyDelete

I hope you've enjoyed this post and found it useful; if so, please leave a comment, everyone is welcome.
Comments are published after I've seen them; this is necessary to avoid spam comments getting published - no offence meant to genuine commenters.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...