25 Nov 2015

(Almost) Wordless Wednesday


I spotted this, one of five buds, on my walk round a very soggy and cold garden at 8 a.m. this morning.

Shouldn't someone tell this sunflower that it's … {say it quietly} almost December?

So, what do we think: London micro-climate, the warmth of a semi-walled garden or just the mild weather getting plants all confused? 

20 comments:

  1. The last of the 3. My garden is the same.

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    1. I was so surprised to see this, Mark, especially as most of my nasturtiums have succumbed to the colder temps. They're usually the last to go. A bit of shelter does wonders for the winter garden.

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  2. That is one maverick plant. Respect.

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    1. LOL! Or possibly not in my garden as I also still have an echinacea, a few scabious, coreopsis, etc. Warm walls, I think. x

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  3. I wonder if it will flower. It's probably a combination of all three. Flighty xx

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    1. I fear it may be taken off in the next frost, Flighty. I shall just appreciate it being there for now. Caro x

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  4. It's extraordinary isn't it. There's a stone wall down the road covered with blooming honeysuckle. And by that, I mean that it actually is blooming. And I have strawberry flowers and green strawberries down at the plot. Nature always has a few surprises for us I think. CJ xx

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    1. Wow, how lovely to pass honeysuckle in bloom when you go out! I've been surprised by seeing a tiny handful of ripened strawberries recently, CJ - but my raspberries have all but finished. I'm always happy to have nature surprise me! Cxx

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  5. I hope it survives! I had a couple of rogue asparagus spears, unfortunately I only spotted them when cutting down the asparagus down for the winter x

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    1. OMG - asparagus spears?! I've just cut all the asparagus ferns down as well and will mulch the bed this weekend, in anticipation of a HUGE (hahaha) harvest next spring. The sun is shining here today so I'm not even thinking about winter until next Tuesday (1st Dec)! C xx

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  6. I have a planter with lilies in bud!

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    1. Amazing! Lilies, at this time of year! Long may it continue!

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  7. Nepeta 'Six Hills Giant' is blooming here-crazy but welcome.

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    1. Gosh, I'd have expected Nepeta to have gone over well before now, especially given all the rain we've had recently. I've also got one lavender bush that I hadn't got round to pruning still in flower which is most definitely welcome.

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  8. All three, I'd say. It's been a peculiar late autumn.

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    1. I think we have had it quite mild here in the south. I've gotten used to bizarre garden flourishes over the past two winters (lavender in January earlier this year!) but this was most unexpected given last weekend's frost. Brrrr.

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  9. Oh my! I seen it all now! I think nature is mightily confused!xxx

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    1. I'd have to agree, Dina. I noticed today (2nd December) that one of my apple trees has got buds on it - BUDS!! If the promised harsh winter strikes, that will be next year's apple harvest done for. C xx

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  10. Our sunflowers are well and truly over.

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    1. As indeed mine should be, Sue. There are a few flowers still hanging on in there - scabious, calendula, coreopsis and one echinacea plant - while my springtime cowslips and other primulas are leafing up nicely. Truly bonkers. Btw, the sunflower has remained in bud; I don't think it will flower now… :o(

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