10 Jul 2015

Planting a ginger surprise



My inability to throw plants away is getting the better of  me.  Just this morning I checked the colander that I keep my onions/garlic/shallots in on the kitchen counter to see if anything needed topping up and found an old piece of ginger that had sprouted.  I found that quite thrilling, that a plant will just appear out of nowhere. In looking up how to plant and grow it, I've found that it's quite a common occurrence to look for pieces of ginger with buds on in the supermarket to start off a home-grown edible ginger plant.

Obviously, I have to try this.  Fate has forced my hand.

I have to plant it into a 6 inch pot, covering the ginger piece (rhizome) but leaving the bud just above the surface.  The soil should be moisture retentive but free draining. This is especially important for container grown plants where you don't want the soil to either dry out or become waterlogged.  I'm using some of my fabulous Wool Compost from Dalefoot (discovered at Chelsea!) as the rhizome likes to be kept moist; the compost is made of bracken and sheep's wool so is moisture retentive, nitrogen rich and peat free -  and the best I've found in a long time.

After planting, water the soil and leave in a warm, non-windy spot out of direct sunlight.  In this warm summer weather, I can leave it outside but bring the pot into a warmer spot, under cover, when the temperature drops below 50F.

By next spring, I should have a decent sized plant (up to a metre tall, if reports are to be believed) but it's the root (rhizome) that is edible and can be dug up and used as usual, using any new buds on the rhizome to start a new plant.  Fresh ginger and a lovely plant in one!

Has anyone else tried this? If so, I'd love to hear how you got on.


Spiked on a corn skewer, it's true size is about 2cm.
(Photographed on my tiny balcony.)



26 comments:

  1. Well that sounds very exciting. Do report back. If it works I shall definitely be trying it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm feeling optimistic about this despite my ability to kill all houseplants in my care. After all, if it can survive the life in the colander, what harm can I do? Apart from overwatering, of course. Or underwatering. Ah well. There will definitely be updates. Unless I kill it. :o) x

      Delete
  2. It'll be interesting to see how you get on with this. Flighty xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, it will - especially as I'm rubbish with indoor plants! (Air plants are my one success story, indoors.)

      Delete
  3. Fresh ginger is even more powerful and flavoursome!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the warning, guys! Don't want the fresh ginger to be too overpowering! Sounds like you've grown the plant in your garden?

      Delete
  4. That looks a good experiment to try! I have planted lemon grass this year for the first time and it is doing quite well so far, have you ever tried growing it?
    Sarah x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it may be a bit of fun, Sarah! I've never tried growing lemon grass although a friend had a plant that she was given. Unfortunately she never used it and then it died. I've a feeling it's not hardy. Hope yours grows for you - do let me know! Caro x

      Delete
  5. No, lemongrass isn't hardy. I had one for a while. The secret is to wait until the supermarket get a new batch in and buy one straight away. I'll be interested to see how the ginger does. I hope you have a good weekend. CJ xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, thanks for confirming that, CJ. I have the same problem with tarragon but I do use that all the time (lovely with chicken!). I don't think I've ever seen fresh lemon grass in my local supermarket - does yours have fresh plants? I'd give it a go, if so! Have a lovely weekend! Rain forecast for Sunday here - hurrah! C xx

      Delete
  6. I have to admit to being rather jealous, I always have ginger in the house yet have NEVER come across a sprouting one! Gosh, how fascinating, I hope it grows, be good to have a follow up!xxx

    ReplyDelete
  7. It's a first for me too, Dina! I was like a kid at Christmas when I found it! Yes, I hope it grows and will definitely be showing off if it all comes good! xx (You'll be going through the ginger now, I daresay, rather than just taking the first piece that comes to hand!)

    ReplyDelete
  8. I have a confession... I thought about growing ginger but just couldn't be bothered; it looked too much like hard work for me! So I hope your hard work is rewarded and puts my laziness to shame.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can understand that, Matt. I'd be the same except that this one has found me so I feel I should give it a try at the very least. Only time will tell if it's going to work! (Indoor plants don't do well for me so we'll see.)

      Delete
    2. I'm rubbish at indoor plants. There's a very sorry looking ficus across the room from me as I type this!

      Delete
    3. Haha! My neighbour in the flat upstairs has moved hers out onto the stairwell. If it wasn't doing well indoors, it will definitely be a goner after a few months in the shade of the stairs. We all have a plant of shame!

      Delete
  9. Snap! I recently found a piece of a ginger that had sprouted still in its plastic bag Caro. I'm ashamed to say that had been resident in the bag for about three months which does not say much about my prowess as a domestic goddess. It's now potted up though so it will be interesting to see what transpires.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, marvellous, Anna! I'm pleased we're both going to be growing ginger from a root - let's compare notes! My ginger pieces tend to lurk once bought - used once for a recipe then consigned to the colander. I don't even buy big pieces …

      Delete
  10. I grow ginger all the time here in tropcial queensland Australia. I would think in your climate you should treat it as a hothouse plant. The ginger plant will only reach three feet at the very most! Some gingers get very tall, but not the edible ginger. good luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi! Thanks for commenting - how exciting to be able to grow ginger outside. - I'm quite envious! I doubt the temps here in London will be hot enough but even a tiny plant will do me. Thanks for the good luck - I'll need it :oD !

      Delete
  11. I think you should grow in this summer and move it into warmer place to keep the plant safe. I hope you'll be success on growing ginger.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wise words, Endah - thank you. Experiments with plants is a good thing, it's how I learn.

      Delete
  12. wow, how exciting! I would want to plant it too, though I suspect a Tasmanian climate is not very encouraging (not right now, especially) - as African aussie says, hothouse may be the way to go. but way to go!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha! Yes! A bit of fun but then gardening shouldn't be all slog and eating!

      Delete
  13. I'm rubbish with indoor plants too (have two rather sorry spider plants that were gifts, still hanging on, and a couple of orchids no longer flowering). I'll be v interested to hear how you get on with this. S x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh! I made the same mistake with orchids; I was given a couple that were table centrepieces at my niece's wedding. The flowers eventually dropped off and I was left with sticks in the pot so threw the plants out. Apparently they will happily regrow and flower if you leave them. The trick is to not overwater them, in fact a perfect plant for neglectful people. Keep your orchids on a bright windowsill (out of sight, heheh) and give them a tiny watering now and then and they should reflower.

      Delete

Comments on my posts are much appreciated and help to build an online community of blog friends. Everyone is welcome! I love to discover new blogs so please leave a comment to introduce yourself.
Caro x

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...